April 22, 2011

Preventing Acid Reflux

Acid reflux disease is a condition that plagues thousands of people every day. The awful thing about the condition is that it can take all the fun out of eating. Who wants to eat if the after affects are heartburn, belching, hiccups, regurgitation, coughing and sometimes nausea? It just doesn’t seem like the price you pay for good eating measures up to the benefit of eating at all. It’s true that the affects of acid reflux can vary from person to person ranging from mild discomfort in some to completely debilitating pain in others. All those suffering from acid reflux, no matter the extremity, can agree that if they could get rid of the condition altogether, it wouldn’t be too soon.

Acid reflux is a condition that if not properly tended to can lead to more serious conditions that can ultimately be life threatening. What happens with acid reflux is the acids found in the stomach that are used to break down foods for digestive purposes aren’t properly concealed in the stomach causing the acids to travel upward from the stomach into the esophagus resulting in acid reflux. The lower esophageal sphincter, LES, is a circular muscle valve that is located at the entrance of the stomach in the lower part of the esophagus. This valve’s job is to allow food and drinks to pass through from the esophagus to the stomach. Immediately after food and drinks pass through this valve, the valve is to close sealing off the stomach and the esophagus. This way, the acids that are rapidly at work digesting the food that has reached the stomach remain in the stomach so that there is no irritation caused to the esophagus.

A great way to control the hyperactivity of your stomach acids so that they are less likely to reach the esophagus resulting in acid reflux would be to prevent acid reflux triggers. There are several ways to prevent acid reflux. Below you will find a few:

  • Eat smaller meals more times a day. The smaller your meals the more likely your stomach acids will be able to take on breaking down and digesting these meals without producing too much acid that may result in acid hyperactivity.
  • Avoid foods that contain chocolate, citrus, caffeine, mint, garlic, onions and other foods that are high in fat. These foods have been known to weaken the LES muscle.
  • Avoid sodas and alcoholic beverages, opt instead for water. Water is great at stabilizing stomach acids and aids in the digestive process.
  • Try not to eat too close to bedtime. Give yourself at least two hours between the last meal of the day and the time you retire. This allows your body adequate time to fully and properly digest your foods.
  • Relieve your stress. Stress is linked to many ailments and acid reflux is no exception. Stress can directly affect the digestive system so do your part to relieve stress through exercise, mediation, and rest.

Preventing acid reflux can be better for your body than taming it after it starts. If you are seeking more preventative methods feel free to visit refluxremedy.com

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