Gastro Reflux

June 7, 2011

Hypertrophic Gastritis

Hypertrophic gastritis is a pre-malignant condition. As a pre-malignant condition, a person may find a way to overcome the possibility of a more serious condition developing if he follows a proper course of action. Whether or not the condition develops into something more serious does not always depend on the patient’s genetics and how close a more serious condition is to developing.

The disease starts with increased folds in the stomach and increased mucus secreted from the stomach lining. A few physical symptoms may include constipation or diarrhea, depending on the internal chemistry of the individual. If the diseases progresses further, acid reflux may occur with all of the other possible symptoms.

When a medical professional diagnoses a patient with this condition in the early stages, the patient can easily take steps to avoid the condition from becoming a more serious problem. The first thing a person can do, if he has not done so already, is to cut down on foods he eats that irritate the stomach lining. This includes sodas, coffees, milks and any other foods to which his particular body chemistry does not respond well. Because the condition occurs before something goes wrong, changing a person’s habits in time can prevent a person from needed more stringent medical services.

A brief cleansing diet, as long as it is performed under the supervision of a doctor, may help the stomach folds to return to their normal consistency. If the condition is not caught soon enough, there is little the patient of the doctor can do but wait to see what it develops into. Because the condition occurs in the internal organs, there is little a person can do about it. The stomach, unlike the heart, is not a muscle, exercise does not help gastritis directly. If the condition is an immune response, exercise may help.

For more information on the hypertrophic gastritis visit today!

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March 10, 2011

Gastro Reflux Symptoms

Gastro reflux, also known as Gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, is a condition stemming from a malfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a muscular ring located at the bottom section of the esophagus. After food travels down the esophagus to the stomach, the LES should close tightly, preventing stomach acids from heading up the esophagus. When this does not occur, and gastric acids are present in the esophagus, this results in heartburn, one of the symptoms of gastro reflux.

Heartburn is caused when acidic contents from the stomach are harmfully transplanted in the esophagus. This back up of acidic liquids and particles, can be severely painful and irritating. The burning sensation felt in the chest, along with hiccups and burping, are also signs of heartburn. People who suffer from heartburn typically experience a bitter taste in their mouth. The symptoms of heartburn are amplified during the night and worsen after eating. Consistent heartburn that occurs more than a few times per week, is a sign that gastro reflux has developed. Chronic heartburn affects a large portion of the population and is used as an indicator in determining if a person is likely to contract gastro reflux.

In some cases, the acidic fluid from the stomach that has backed up to the esophagus and throat can cause people to have difficulty breathing. If the refluxed fluid aggravates the larynx, the affected person can become hoarse, have a sore throat or temporarily lose their voice. The acidic juices can also irritate the respiratory track and make the breathing process strenuous and exhausting.

When the gastric acid reaches the throat (pharynx) and mouth, the burning feeling is magnified. The sour tasting substance can cause halitosis (bad breath) and hinder social interaction. Excessive burping, a common symptom of gastro reflux, is often wet and foul smelling. The liquid that is expelled during belching may burn and cause physical irritation.

Regurgitation is another uncomfortable symptom of gastro reflux. This takes place when food is swallowed but forced back up the esophagus due to a reflux reaction. The food and liquids that are regurgitated are highly acidic, and will burn the esophagus and throat. Depending on the amount and frequency of acidic substance that has been brought back up from the stomach, a person may need to discard the contents publicly, which can be humiliating.

Symptoms of gastro reflux are usually exacerbated due to certain behaviors and lifestyle choices. People that smoke tend to increase the effects of gastro reflux symptoms. Bending over, lifting heavy objects and even lying down may cause gastro reflux as well. Drink alcohol, and partaking in caffeinated products may contribute to gastro reflux.

Extended exposure to gastro reflux has the potential to develop into esophagitis. Esophagitis is characterized by severe inflammation to the esophagus that may reduce the size of the esophagus and hinder normal swallowing functions.

For more information on the symptoms of gastro reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease, visit today.

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March 3, 2011

Gastric Acid Reflux

Gastric acid reflux also known as just acid reflux is a gateway disease, which means it often ends up progressively getting worse.

The gastric acid used to digest your food is designed to stay within the boundary of your stomach. Your gastric juices are kept sealed in the stomach chamber by special cells and sphincters or sealing flaps.

If you are suffering from gastric acid reflux the best thing you can do is change your dietary and lifestyle habits. If you’ve tried that approach and failed you need to seek out a qualified health professional.

There are important things you need to know about gastric acid reflux. First of all if gastric acid reflux is a bad problem you need to have your doctor check your stomach acid levels.

Most people are under the false impression that gastric acid reflux problems are only triggered from too much gastric acid . . .

Be aware that gastric acid deficiency is very common, more common than actually making too much gastric stomach acid.

The various cells that manufacture your gastric acid require adequate vitamins, enzymes and their co-factors. Co-factors generally mean minerals.

Minerals are necessary for the proper function and absorption of enzymes and nutrients.

Fact is you are most likely experiencing a nutritional deficiency of sorts, which in turn is causing your gastric acid to reflux or rebound to places it isn’t meant to go.

Before you start making assumptions that your gastric acid reflux is exclusively caused from too much gastric stomach acid and start popping handfuls of antacids . . .you better be absolutely sure you’re doing the correct thing.

Treating your symptoms of gastric acid reflux with antacids when all you need is proper nutrition will make your health suffer, eventually making a gastric irritation into a full-fledged gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Once your gastric acid reflux becomes GERD, your GERD can progress into Barrett’s disease.

It’s estimated that 1 out of 100 people who develop Barrett’s disease end up with throat cancer, which can be deadly.

So before you start jumping to pharmaceuticals to treat your gastric acid reflux, first test your stomach acid. Testing for stomach acid is a simple medical test. Always ask your doctor first!

You were born to heal,

Todd M. Faass

Health Advocate

Hiatal Hernia Pain





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February 28, 2011

Gastro Reflux Disease

The muscle located between the stomach and the esophagus is called the lower esophageal sphincter. If this muscle relaxes and does not close tightly after food passes through to the stomach, this can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastro reflux disease. Typically, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) only permits foods and beverages to flow downward into the stomach, not the other way around. A relaxed LES that permits food and stomach acid to travel backwards and reflux into the esophagus can cause tremendous pain, discomfort and injury.


Certain foods can promote gastro reflux disease. Your diet is an integral part of causing or preventing GERD. Foods and drinks with a heavy amount of garlic, caffeine and onion have the ability to increase reflux frequency. Each individual has specified foods that can trigger reflux and contribute to gastro esophageal reflux disease. Eating foods right before bed or meals that are high in fat are also dietary factors that can cause GERD.

Over the counter medications can also promote GERD. These include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) used to reduce pain. Common NSAIDs are ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen. Vitamins and other supplements may be risky too. Consuming potassium, calcium, and iron tablets can cause GERD.

Women who are pregnant risk contracting GERD. Due to the size and placement of the fetus growing inside of them, other organs usually shift in order to accommodate the baby. Depending on how the stomach position is naturally modified, this may force stomach acid to reflux. If acid reflux becomes excessive this could lead to GERD.

Some health conditions are directly related to the occurrence of gastro reflux disease. Obesity can lead to GERD because the stomach may not be able to withstand the pressure caused by excess weight. The extra weight can strain the abdominal area, causing reflux.

Unhealthy habits affect gastro reflux disease. Smoking and excessive alcohol consumption serves as triggers for the development of GERD. Lying down during and after meals can cause heartburn, a symptom of gastro reflux disease.


Regurgitation happens when acid backs up into the throat and mouth. This may come with burping that produces a bitter taste and foul smelling breath.

Heartburn is normally felt after eating or lying down. A burning pain in the chest and throat are symptoms of heartburn.

Dysphagia is a sign of gastro reflux and is associated with having difficulty swallowing food, managing food in the mouth and controlling saliva.


Treatment of gastro reflux disease can be done through simple changes to your lifestyle and diet. By taking note of the foods you eat when heartburn or another symptom occurs, you can determine what to eliminate from your diet. By quitting smoking, not eating before bed, and using other pain relieving medications, you can reduce your risk of gastro reflux disease.

If you want more information on gastro reflux disease, visit for the latest information on how you can treat GERD naturally.

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