Heartburn Symptoms

October 27, 2011

Persistent Heartburn

Heartburn is a common condition in which a burning sensation is felt rising from the stomach towards the throat. This burning feeling is caused by stomach acid washing back up from the stomach into the esophagus.

Normally, a valve at the end of the esophagus seals off the contents of our stomachs, but sometimes this process does not work properly, typically just following a meal. Heartburn symptoms may be mild and infrequent or, in more serious cases, last for weeks or months.

Persistent heartburn can be extremely uncomfortable and even require a doctor’s care if it becomes a chronic condition. It can occur after eating, when lying down, or when you bend forward. If you have heartburn, you will often have a bitter or sour taste in your mouth from the stomach acid flowing back up into your esophagus. Other symptoms include hoarseness, cough, nausea, trouble swallowing, and chest pain. However, unlike heart attack symptoms, this type of pain is not localized to one side of the chest.

When heartburn becomes chronic in nature it can develop into a more serious condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. The condition can lead to damage to the esophagus. The injuries may include: reflux esopagitis, esophageal strictures, Barrett’s esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma- a rare form of cancer.

An esophageal pH monitoring test is often performed to check for GERD. It is considered to be the most objective test for diagnosing the disease. It also allows for monitoring of GERD patients to show how they are responding to medical intervention.

There are a number of factors that can cause GERD. Obesity is often associated with more severe cases of GERD. The presence of a hiatal hernia also increases the risks of acquiring GERD, due to its effects on motility of the stomach. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a disorder with a GERD correlation. This syndrome increases gastric acidity through gastrin production. Another cause of GERD is visceroptosis or Glenard syndrome, where the stomach sinks into the abdominal cavity, disrupting the acid secretion and motility of the stomach.

The presence of cardiac disease is one condition that must first be eliminated as a cause of persistent heartburn. If a person has unexplained chest pain on one side of the chest, they need to see a doctor to be sure of what they are dealing with. The two conditions can have a similar set of symptoms since the esophagus and heart share the same nerve supply.

Chest pain caused by heartburn is typically described as a “burning” sensation, happens after eating, and grows worse when the person bends over or lies down. It is not uncommon in pregnant women, and can occur after consuming large amounts of food, or certain spicy foods, fatty foods, or acidic foods. It can sometimes be attributed to esophageal spasms.

Fortunately, treatments are available for persistent heartburn and the intervention of a doctor is rarely required. If you suffer from persistent heartburn, for more information and resources please visit Reflux Remedy at refluxremedy.com today.

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October 3, 2011

Frequent Heartburn

Do you ever feel a painful, burning sensation in your chest, just beneath your breastbone? Perhaps, you are sometimes awakened out of a sound sleep, your throat feeling like it just caught fire.

If these symptoms sound familiar, you are probably suffering from heartburn. Many people suffer from frequent heartburn, a condition that is characterized by symptoms that flare- up at least twice a week.


Heartburn occurs when the acidic juices from digested foods creep into the esophagus, a tube that links the throat and stomach. Because of the tube’s thin walls, the juices irritate its lining, resulting in a burning feeling in the chest.

Individuals who experience frequent heartburn have a weakened lower esophogeal sphincter, a.k.a. as the LES. The LES serves as a barrier between the stomach and esophagus. When the LES is too relaxed, stomach juices leak into the esophagus, causing heartburn.


A person’s diet can contribute to heartburn symptoms. Caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, sodas, or chocolate have a relaxing effect on the LES, which permits stomach juices to pass through the LES. Chocolate has an additional chemical called theobromine that affects LES functioning. Other food culprits that promote LES relaxation are tomatoes, citrus fruits, and peppermint.

Fried, greasy, and fatty foods hamper one’s digestion and sit in the stomach longer. This puts more pressure on the stomach, culminating in a lazy LES that allows acidic juices to seep out. Alcohol, which encourages more stomach acid production, is another possible heartburn trigger.

Consuming a lot of food at one sitting increases LES pressure. WHEN a person eats plays a factor; eating two to three hours before bedtime is not good for heartburn. Lying down after a hearty meal can worsen heartburn symptoms.


Smoking can aggravate heartburn symptoms, the chemicals in cigarettes weakening the LES and restricting blood flow to inflamed tissues. Tight clothes that cling to the stomach can cause flare-ups, the pressure pushing food against the LES and juices up the esophagus.


Fortunately, there are several ways to treat frequent heartburn. Changing one’s diet and avoiding problematic foods are a good start. Eliminating or reducing one’s caffeine and alcohol intake is suggested. One should stay away from greasy and spicy foods, heavy sauces, and red meat. Unprocessed, healthy foods to consume are raw vegetables and nuts, seeds, grains, and flaxseed. Other suggestions include chewing one’s food slowly and putting down one’s fork before feeling stuffed.

Drinking a glass of water every two hours helps alleviate heartburn episodes, as well as neutralizing stomach acids. Incorporating a glass of cabbage juice into one’s diet can offer relief, its juice soothing the digestive tract. Reducing the amount of aspirin and pain relievers can decrease heartburn. Other changes include eating light, frequent meals throughout the day and losing excess weight.

If dietary changes do not reduce heartburn symptoms, medication is another alternative. For more information on causes and cures for heartburn, be sure to visit Reflux Remedy at refluxremedy.com today!

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June 21, 2011

Heartburn Remedy

How to Get Rid of HeartburnHeartburn refers to a form of indigestion caused by acid regurgitating into the esophagus. It is identified by a painful burning sensation in the chest. Chronic heartburn can be incredibly difficult to live with and can often be solved with a change of diet and lifestyle. Taking antacids or other drugs may mask the problem but will not make the permanently heartburn go away.

One of the most important things you can do is to stop drinking alcohol, or at least cut back drastically. Alcohol not only increases the amount of acid in the stomach, it also relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter, causing the contents in your stomach to be regurgitated back into the esophagus. Coupled with reducing your alcohol intake, you should also try to stop ingesting things that irritate the esophagus and digestive tract, such as pain killers, energy drinks and sodas. In terms of beverages, water is really the best thing for your digestive system.

Avoiding fried food will also help to put an end to your heartburn. Heavy, deep fried foods irritate the digestive tract, causing heartburn. Eat healthy fats, such as pastured butter, coconut oil and olive oil, and bake, broil or grill your food.

Losing any extra weight you may be carrying is another way to get rid of heartburn. One fairly quick way to do this is to cut back on carbohydrates, eat lots of vegetables and get moderate exercise several times a week. Junk food needs to become a thing of the past. Even losing a small amount of weight can help reduce heartburn.

It’s crucial to know your body and learn what you may be sensitive to. Some foods can be more irritating to certain people. Some of the more irritating foods are spicy flavors and acidic vegetables and fruits. Eating large meals at night is incredibly hard on the digestive tract. It’s important to not lie down after eating. Small portions are best, also.

If you’re eating lots of healthy fats, fresh produce, and lean protein your heartburn may quickly disappear from your life. Since these remedies may take weeks to take effect, there are some home remedies you can try that will give you faster relief.

Drinking a tablespoon of baking soda mixed into a glass of water will neutralize the acid in your stomach, as will yogurt. Some teas and herbs that will relieve heartburn are chamomile, parsley, cinnamon, fennel seeds, peppermint, cumin, lemon balm and ginger. Some fruits that will help to neutralize the acid in your stomach are bananas, rhubarb and papayas, through there are some who are sensitive to papaya. Apple cider vinegar can quickly relieve heartburn pain. Mix a teaspoon of vinegar into a glass of water and drink it. The vinegar will balance the pH and reduce the amount of acid in the stomach. Pickle juice also has properties that will help balance the pH in the stomach.

Some supplements that will treat heartburn are the B vitamins, folic acid and the amino acid l-tryptophan. For more information on remedies for heartburn be sure to visit refluxremedy.com today!

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June 7, 2011

Acid Heartburn Indigestion

People who suffer from acid heartburn and indigestion can tell you how miserable it is. Many people take medication for it, but medication can have nasty side-effects that are sometimes worse than heartburn. Instead of taking medication, try these simple and natural ways to relieve and prevent acid heartburn and indigestion.

Do not lie down after eating

If you lie down after eating, you increase the risk of getting heartburn. For this reason, it is best to eat a couple of hours before going to bed. If, however, you do lie down after eating, find a way to elevate your body so you’re not laying flat.

Drink dissolved baking soda

Dissolve a bit of baking soda into water and drink it. Baking soda can provide relief from acid heartburn, but remember to read the box for any words of warning.

Don’t eat a lot

Many people eat large dinners to compensate for missed meals. However, eating too much food can cause your stomach acid to overwork and cause heartburn. It’s best to eat many small meals throughout the day. Doing this will help you manage your acid heartburn and indigestion as well as your weight.

Monitor your diet

Spicy foods and fried foods easily cause heartburn, so avoid these foods if possible. Other foods that contribute to heartburn include garlic, tomatoes, citrus, and alcohol. It is not necessary to eliminate them from your diet; however, it is necessary to monitor how much of these foods you eat.

Exercise more often

You can prevent future heartburn by exercising. Exercising keeps your body functioning properly, and it also helps you burn stored fat and calories. Stored calories are a contributing factor to heartburn, so it is good to burn them with exercises.

These simple tips will help you prevent or relieve heartburn symptoms. Most of these tips are not hard to incorporate in your daily routine. It only takes a little effort to prevent acid heartburn and indigestion.

For more information on Acid Heartburn Indigestion visit refluxremedy.com.

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