Stomach Acid

June 21, 2011

Inflammation of the Stomach

Inflammation of the stomach, sometimes known by the medical term of gastritis, is a medical condition with a variety of causes. Some surgeries, particularly weight loss surgeries, can cause inflammation, along with drinking too much alcohol, taking certain medications such as over the counter pain relievers, and bacterial infections. Even having too much stress in one’s life can increase the chance of developing an inflamed stomach, perhaps due to the reduction in immune defenses that which leaves the stomach open to infection.

Sometimes, inflammation of the stomach can occur without symptoms, but more likely severe abdominal pain is the first sign of this inflammation for many people. This pain usually occurs in the upper central abdomen, but can actually occur anywhere in the abdomen, and may take many different forms, from a burning pain, to a sharp, stabbing feeling. Many other symptoms can occur, including nausea and vomiting, to the point that vomit may even include blood, bloating, burping that does not make the pain go away, loss of appetite, feeling full quickly, and dangerous weight loss.

Acute inflammation is usually due to losing the mucous that normally protects the stomach from its own acid, and often occurs after drinking too much or taking certain medications, including Tylenol and Aspirin. Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, is due to the destruction of the stomach lining, and can occur from bacterial infection, autoimmune diseases, and bile released into the stomach from other medical conditions. Over time, chronic gastritis can result in the death of cells needed to create the protective mucousal lining.

Expensive surgeries and prescription drugs used to treat inflammation of the stomach are not always the best options for treatment, since they can have unintended side effects, and medications may actually make the situation worse when they wear off, forcing a person to take them continuously for long periods of time. A variety of home remedies exist that can not only treat stomach inflammation symptoms, but actually cure the underlying problem as well.

Generally, a person with an inflamed stomach should avoid all dairy products such as milk, since these can make the problem worse. Drinking at least eight glasses of water a day will also help to flush out any toxins in the stomach and promote healing. Taking vitamin E can help to reduce inflammation, but also taking two chlorophyll capsules each day can help to treat anemia, which can sometimes be the underlying cause of inflammation. Licorice can help treat inflammation as well as the ulcers that result from it; for best results, 300 to 600 mg should be chewed one half hour before eating a meal. Ginger can help with most symptoms of inflammation when it is taken on a daily basis, reducing inflammation, nausea, and gas, and killing bacteria that might be causing the inflammation.

If you suffer from stomach inflammation, you can get more information here. Download the Reflux Remedy Report at to learn more about curing inflammation safely and quickly using healthy, natural remedies.

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March 11, 2011

Stomach Acids

While most organs of the body are neutral or alkaline, a highly acidic stomach is needed in order to digest food. People are biologically equipped with gastric acid that breaks down food once it enters the stomach. When food is chewed and swallowed, the food travels through the esophagus and into the stomach. The essential nutrients are still too course and complex to be absorbed into the blood stream and effectively utilized by the body. The digestive juices of the stomach aid the body in extracting the necessary vitamin and mineral elements, while leaving behind the waste.


The stomach is a vital organ that is comprised of a mixture of acidic liquid components. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is the main component of gastric acid, along with substantial portions of potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium chloride (NaCl). This corrosive compound has a pH of 1 to 2, and can be dangerous in any other part of the body. The blend of acids provides the perfect balance for breaking down all kinds of carbohydrates and protein. To protect itself from its own acid, the stomach is lined with a bicarbonate base at the mucosa layer. This base neutralizes the acid that contacts the stomach directly.


The stomach wall is lined with several layers, one of which features parietal cells that secrete gastric acid into the lumen of the stomach. Secretion occurs in three phases: the cephalic, gastric and intestinal. Stomach acid production is controlled through hormones and the visceral nervous system. Stomach acid formation occurs naturally based on the amount of food deposited in the stomach. Larger quantities of food will cause the stomach to produce greater amounts of gastric acid.

Food Break Down

Gastric acids activate enzymes like pepsinogen, subsequently modifying into pepsin, which deconstructs proteins into peptides. Peptides, polymers of amino acids, allow the body to use the amino acids beneficially. Stomach acid also serves as a defense system against harmful germs and bacteria found in foods and beverages. The high acidity kills most dangerous microorganisms and bacteria, eliminating the strain on the immune system. Once completely broken down, the particles are transferred to the large and small intestine where nutrients are extracted and waste is passed through to the rectum.

Acid Reflux

When the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), located above the stomach, abnormally fails to tighten properly, or is constantly opened, the risk of stomach acid ascending through the esophagus is increased. If the acid travels to the esophagus this may cause intense heartburn and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), a disease that affects millions of people. The acidity of the gastric acid creates a burning sensation that can be irritating and very painful. Regurgitation, a symptom of GERD, causes people to be orally exposed to gastric acid and experience a sour and sometimes bitter taste in their mouth.

For more information on how stomach acid affects heartburn and acid reflux, visit

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March 2, 2011

Symptoms for Acid Reflux

Most people that are affected by acid reflux don’t know it at first. Acid reflux is a disease that stems from a lower esophageal sphincter that isn’t working properly. Imagine that the food you eat is swallowed, goes through your esophagus, lands in your stomach and then all of a sudden goes back into the esophagus and even your mouth. Food from your stomach is now completely infused with gastric acid, and this is what makes acid reflux uncomfortable and unhealthy. The acid from your stomach does not feel good in any other part of the body and is meant to break down food for the extraction of nutrients.

Stomach acid that is out of place causes you to feel a burning sensation, associated with heartburn or acid indigestion, a symptom for acid reflux. Heartburn affects millions of people every year. Many of these people only experience heartburn on occasion. Those who feel heartburn more than twice a week probably have acid reflux disease. You can identify if you have heartburn based on the severe irritation you may feel in your chest, stomach and throat. This irritation can cause you to feel like your insides are burning and can cause a painful feeling.

The heartburn that you feel because of acid reflux is sometimes accompanied by incessant burping and hiccups. Not only do you have the awful burning sensation in your esophagus, but you may have wet burps that expel stomach acid, bile and food particles into your mouth. Now the acid has a chance to irritate the mouth and oral cavity. A gross taste and smell is the result.

Another symptom for acid reflux is nausea. Nausea makes your stomach feel uneasy and urges you to burp and even throw up. The worst part of nausea is when you vomit up gastric acid, upsetting the throat and esophagus even further. The feeling of nausea can impede motor skills, social interaction and can increase general stress.

Regurgitating food is a symptom for acid reflux. Regurgitation happens when a substantial amount of food is refluxed from your stomach. This is usually uncomfortable and can prevent you from getting the proper nutrition and energy from the foods you eat.

Dysphagia can occur as a result of acid reflux. This may be one of the more stressful symptoms for acid reflux. Dysphagia makes you feel as though your food is stuck in your neck or throat. This increases difficulty with swallowing and can prevent you from eating an adequate serving of food every day.

Acid reflux disease is also commonly known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. GERD has many of the same symptoms as acid reflux and may be used interchangeably. You don’t have to worry and wonder about the symptoms of acid reflux if you know what to look out for. For more information on these and other symptoms for acid reflux, visit today. Becoming informed is the first step in managing and treating this disease.

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January 17, 2011

Pain in Stomach After Eating

If you experience pain in your stomach after eating, you may have an ulcer. If your pain is intense, or has been going on for quite some time, you should seek the advice of a physician.

Generally, stomach ulcers are caused by bacteria called H. Pylori, not by stress or spicy foods as was once thought. H. Pylori is a corkscrew shaped bacteria that is fairly common among all people, regardless of age, sex or health condition. What causes it to run rampant in some people and not others is still a mystery, but if your ulcer is blamed on H. Pylori, you’ll likely be prescribed a series of medications and tests to make sure the bacteria is eradicated.

Regardless of the cause of your stomach pain after you eat, there are a number of things you can do to help prevent or relieve it.

  • First, modify how much food you take in at once. By limiting your intake, but increasing the number of times you eat during the day, you can help your stomach to better deal with the digestion process, and reduce stress on your body.
  • Second, make sure you’re not eating foods that will aggravate a stomach ulcer or other digestive disorder. Things like fatty foods, dairy products, garlic, acidic fruits like citrus, caffeine and onions should be avoided. Breads and products that contain whole grains, fish and lean meats and fruit containing antioxidants (like the ‘superfruit’ blueberries) should be targeted if you suspect an ulcer.
  • Third, although you may be trying to target certain foods and avoid others, a balanced diet is crucial to maintaining a healthy body. Everything in moderation is vital. Make sure your body gets the nutrients it needs to heal by providing it with essential vitamins found in all types of food.
  • Fourth, exercise regularly to keep oxygen rich blood flowing throughout your body. This will help your body heal, and prevent future injuries and traumas like ulcers.
  • Fifth, don’t take pain killers if you’re experiencing pain in your stomach after you eat. Although pain killers may be your first instinct when you’re having pain, just don’t do it. Pain killers can often exacerbate an ulcer and take your situation from bad to worse. Even over the counter pain medications have been shown to cause ulcers, so if you already have one, don’t aggravate it by taking additional pain medications.
  • Sixth, if you’re a smoker, quit. Smoking has been scientifically shown to cause a host of health problems, including death, so quitting will help your case. It actually increases acid production in your stomach, which can irritate an existing ulcer. So just quit it.
  • Lastly, make sure you’re keeping your stress levels down to a healthy amount. Too much stress causes the body to create excess stomach acid, which irritates the esophagus and stomach lining, making it difficult for an ulcer to heal. So, meditate, take deep breaths, listen to music, take up a hobby, or anything else that helps you stay calm in a stressful situation.

Pain in the stomach after eating can be a debilitating symptom of a potentially serious problem. For more information on this disorder and how you can help your body heal from it, visit today.

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