acidic exposure

March 11, 2011

Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

When the lower portion of the esophagus, referred to as the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), relaxes at inappropriate times, this may prompt stomach acid, digestive juices and food particles to irregularly backup into the esophagus. A LES that frequently opens and does not close tightly increases the opportunity for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease or GERD to arise.

Lower Esophageal Sphincter

People that suffer from frequent heartburn, more than twice a week, are often unaware that they may be affected by GERD. As stomach acid seeps into your esophagus, this causes heartburn, the primary symptom of GERD. The occurrence of heartburn or acid reflux induces a burning sensation at the chest area that is irritating and painful. This sensation is usually followed by burping and hiccupping. Chronic heartburn may signal that GERD has developed.

Stomach acid or food that has traveled through the esophagus and entered into the oral cavity may be defined as regurgitation, another symptom of GERD. Producing a foul odor and bitter taste, this symptom can be unpleasant. Regurgitation forces acidic exposure in the mouth, which burns and tingles. Consistent regurgitation can become embarrassing in social settings.

Dysphagia is frequently associated with GERD. Difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods is a sign of dysphagia . This creates an uncomfortable feeling while eating. Dyspepsia happens as a result of GERD and encompasses several ailments that include abdominal pain and nausea.

Habitual and lifestyle triggers of GERD:

  • Consuming large meals promotes stomach pressure and causes the onset of acid indigestion.
  • Eating less than two hours before bed can cause acid buildup.
  • Vitamins and Medications: Using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen, may aggravate GERD. Calcium, iron and potassium usage can also increase risk.
  • Smoking exponentially enlarges the risk of GERD because this activity weakens the muscular capability of the LES and reduces the secretion of saliva, which counterbalances acid.
  • Alcohol consumption worsens GERD symptoms due to the relaxing effect on the LES.
  • Diet plays a massive role in GERD. Fatty and acidic foods are the biggest contributors to GERD. People are affected differently by certain foods. Common foods that promote GERD symptoms include garlic, caffeine and citrus.
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy treatment can increase the likelihood of GERD symptoms in postmenopausal women.

Health conditions are linked to GERD.

  • GERD may be hereditary. Many people are genetically predisposed to GERD and inherit physical problems that enhance everyday risk.
  • Hiatal Hernia symptoms are similar to that of heartburn and take place when the stomach shifts and protrudes through the diaphragm.
  • People with respiratory diseases like asthma are susceptible to GERD.
  • Laryngitis, Sinusitis and chronic cough are also associated with GERD.
  • Health Factors like obesity, pregnancy and diabetes increase vulnerability to GERD symptoms.
  • Those suffering from GERD may worsen other pre-existing diseases and conditions.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease can be very painful and debilitating. These common symptoms can guide you when trying to detect GERD. For additional information on gastro reflux symptoms, please visit and learn more about GERD.

Filed under Gastroesophageal Reflux, Gastrointestinal Disease by

Permalink Print Comment

Privacy Policy - Terms of Service

©2016 Barton Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Toll Free: 1.888.356.1146 Outside US: +1.617.603.0085
Phone Support is available between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM EST
PO Box 50, Brandon, SD 57005 USA