chronic cough

September 22, 2011

Gerd and Coughing

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD, is diagnosed when an individual suffers symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn at least twice a week. GERD is a digestive disorder that is the result of stomach acid returning to the esophagus, consequently irritating the lining of the esophagus. Initially lifestyle change and self-care procedures are utilized in order to try and control the reflux and heartburn. However, when these symptoms occur frequently or interfere with daily activities and are not efficiently managed with home remedies it is important to make an appointment to visit a medical professional.

GERD is most likely caused by a weakened band of muscle at the bottom of the esophagus. Under normal circumstances, once food passes through the esophagus to the stomach, the valve at the bottom of the esophagus will close and prevent liquids and stomach acid from coming back up into the esophageal tract. When this valve does not function properly an individual will begin to experience the symptoms of GERD which will worsen over time. Complications include scar tissue or ulcers in the esophageal tract.

Beyond the symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn sufferers may also experience a persistent cough and trouble with swallowing. Chronic cough is defined as a cough that has persisted eight or more weeks and its presence has yet to be explained. It is not thoroughly understood how a dry cough which may worsen at night, is related to GERD although it continues to be researched. Studies have found that by treating GERD the cough is also managed when cough is the presenting symptom by a patient. A plausible explanation of the relationship is that coughing is an effective way for the body to rid itself of irritants and excess fluids. Sufferers of GERD and concurrent chronic cough may find relief in avoiding lying down after meals, not eating meals that exacerbate the condition, and elevating the head when sleeping.

There are a variety of measures which are adequate for diagnosing GERD once the initial medical appointment has been made. These include x-rays, endoscopies, and esophageal tests that measure the amount of stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus. To begin treatment a patient will initiate lifestyle changes such as attaining and maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding foods that worsen heartburn, and abstaining from food and liquids close to bedtime. Along with these actions a patient can also take over-the-counter antacids and medications. If through following this regimen symptoms are not alleviated, prescription medications will be recommended. As with the over-the-counter medications there are prescriptions available that reduce acid production and there are also medications available that can strengthen the valve that connects the esophagus and stomach. Additionally, these medications assist with emptying the contents of your stomach more quickly. In more severe cases surgery to repair the esophagus or the valve located between the esophagus and stomach are considered when prescriptions are not adequately treating GERD or when long term use of medicine is not desired.

GERD is a digestive disease for which there are numerous treatments available depending on the severity. Untreated GERD is uncomfortable and interferes with daily living. Find out about ways to treat GERD in order to avoid a chronic cough be sure to visit Reflux Remedy at today!

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March 11, 2011

Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

When the lower portion of the esophagus, referred to as the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), relaxes at inappropriate times, this may prompt stomach acid, digestive juices and food particles to irregularly backup into the esophagus. A LES that frequently opens and does not close tightly increases the opportunity for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease or GERD to arise.

Lower Esophageal Sphincter

People that suffer from frequent heartburn, more than twice a week, are often unaware that they may be affected by GERD. As stomach acid seeps into your esophagus, this causes heartburn, the primary symptom of GERD. The occurrence of heartburn or acid reflux induces a burning sensation at the chest area that is irritating and painful. This sensation is usually followed by burping and hiccupping. Chronic heartburn may signal that GERD has developed.

Stomach acid or food that has traveled through the esophagus and entered into the oral cavity may be defined as regurgitation, another symptom of GERD. Producing a foul odor and bitter taste, this symptom can be unpleasant. Regurgitation forces acidic exposure in the mouth, which burns and tingles. Consistent regurgitation can become embarrassing in social settings.

Dysphagia is frequently associated with GERD. Difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods is a sign of dysphagia . This creates an uncomfortable feeling while eating. Dyspepsia happens as a result of GERD and encompasses several ailments that include abdominal pain and nausea.

Habitual and lifestyle triggers of GERD:

  • Consuming large meals promotes stomach pressure and causes the onset of acid indigestion.
  • Eating less than two hours before bed can cause acid buildup.
  • Vitamins and Medications: Using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen, may aggravate GERD. Calcium, iron and potassium usage can also increase risk.
  • Smoking exponentially enlarges the risk of GERD because this activity weakens the muscular capability of the LES and reduces the secretion of saliva, which counterbalances acid.
  • Alcohol consumption worsens GERD symptoms due to the relaxing effect on the LES.
  • Diet plays a massive role in GERD. Fatty and acidic foods are the biggest contributors to GERD. People are affected differently by certain foods. Common foods that promote GERD symptoms include garlic, caffeine and citrus.
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy treatment can increase the likelihood of GERD symptoms in postmenopausal women.

Health conditions are linked to GERD.

  • GERD may be hereditary. Many people are genetically predisposed to GERD and inherit physical problems that enhance everyday risk.
  • Hiatal Hernia symptoms are similar to that of heartburn and take place when the stomach shifts and protrudes through the diaphragm.
  • People with respiratory diseases like asthma are susceptible to GERD.
  • Laryngitis, Sinusitis and chronic cough are also associated with GERD.
  • Health Factors like obesity, pregnancy and diabetes increase vulnerability to GERD symptoms.
  • Those suffering from GERD may worsen other pre-existing diseases and conditions.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease can be very painful and debilitating. These common symptoms can guide you when trying to detect GERD. For additional information on gastro reflux symptoms, please visit and learn more about GERD.

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March 7, 2011

Heartburn and Symptoms

Heartburn, by far, is one of the main symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and acid reflux. Heartburn symptoms are not to be expected of all people who suffer from acid reflux or GERD. Experiencing heartburn does not necessarily mean that these digestive conditions are present. The following symptoms of heartburn are the most common and suggest that GERD or acid reflux has already developed.

Burning Sensation (Throat): When gastric acid backup into the esophagus, this can create a painful, burning sensation in the throat, especially at the highest part of the neck. This feeling becomes more painful while eating or drinking.

Burning Sensation (Chest): The chest is usually the site where an intense burning sensation is felt. At the sternum and esophagus, you may feel acidic liquids burn and irritate these areas.

Chest Pain: This occurs often while experiencing heartburn. This symptom is typically triggered by physical maneuvers that include lying down, bending over or eating a heavy meal. Chest pain can be mild to severe, depending on the type of meal eaten, your weight and other factors.

Chronic Coughing: Some cases of heartburn encompass a chronic cough. This persistent cough is as a result of the acid that has refluxed into the esophagus. A chronic cough can be disruptive to everyday behaviors and lifestyle, sometimes limiting your function at work or socially.

Sore Throat/Hoarseness: A sore throat is another symptom of heartburn. The acid that reaches the throat from the stomach burns and forces the throat to become inflamed. This irritation discourages people from speaking or even eating certain foods, as it can be painful. If you are required to speak a lot in your profession or at home with your family, this can become very inconvenient.

Difficulty Swallowing: Dysphagia, a common condition, typically occurs in conjunction with heartburn. This condition includes difficulty in swallowing solid foods and causes you to feel like food has become lodged in your throat or esophagus. In severe circumstances, this may feel as though you are choking.

Bitter Taste: Stomach acid refluxes through the esophagus and into the throat. This creates a foul smelling odor within the mouth. The acid usually tastes bitter or sour, and can be unpleasant. The bitter and sour taste may prevent you from desiring certain foods. These foods can possibly taste terrible to you because of acid reflux.

The symptoms and occurrence of heartburn are sometimes mistaken as a signal of digestive disorders. There are circumstances in which chest pain reflects a cardiovascular problem, and could lead to a heart attack if not taken seriously, or assumed to be related to acid reflux. Although all these symptoms can alert you to the fact that you are experiencing heartburn, they do not all have to occur in order to for heartburn to be the cause.

If you are searching for a remedy for the many symptoms of heartburn, visit today and find out how you can naturally control and free yourself of this debilitating condition.

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February 25, 2011

Reflux Disorder

When the esophagus becomes inflamed and irritated due to contact with gastric acids, this is called reflux disorder. You may be wondering how gastric acids from the stomach end up in your esophagus. The esophagus spans from your throat to your abdomen. This is the method by which food travels from your mouth and into your stomach. When food makes it to the bottom of the esophagus it must pass through the lower esophageal sphincter, a ring-like muscle that acts as a gatekeeper for solid and liquid foods. Once food is in the stomach, acids are produced in order for digestion to continue. If you have a lower esophageal sphincter that keeps the gate open or leaves a crack in the gate, this can allow corrosive stomach acids to reflux to the esophagus. Reflux disorder is harmful to the body and disrupts the digestion process.


There are several contributing factors for reflux disorder.

  • Routine has a lot to do with the onset of reflux disorder. Alcohol use, cigarette addiction, and eating habits play a major role. Eating foods then lying down or having extra large portions can aggravate stomach acid and cause reflux.
  • Diet affects all mechanisms of the body. Foods that are laden with fat and fried in oil are not recommended as they may cause reflux disorder. Foods with caffeine, chocolate, garlic and onions can trigger acid reflux.
  • Medications used to relieve pain and other problems can contribute to reflux disorder. Pain relievers like aspirin and ibuprofen are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that adversely affect you by irritating the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Medical conditions like pregnancy, obesity, diabetes and hiatal hernia commonly cause reflux disorder.



Symptoms of reflux disorder are different for adults and children.

  • Heartburn is the most widespread and universal symptom of reflux disorder. When gastric acid reaches the esophagus, there is a burning sensation at the chest. Since the heart rests above the esophagus, it is referred to as heartburn. Heartburn sometimes travels from the stomach to the throat.
  • Regurgitating stomach acid into the mouth is the second most common symptom of reflux disorder.
  • Other symptoms of reflux disorder include a chronic cough, sour or bitter taste in the mouth, sore throat, hoarseness, nausea and difficulty swallowing.



Treatment for reflux disorder varies based on frequency and intensity. Some people may be able to modify their lifestyle and diet, while others may require more drastic methods. Trying to treat reflux disorder using natural remedies is highly recommended. To relieve symptoms of reflux disorder try the following:

  • Elevate your head while sleeping. This helps gravity to keep stomach acid down.
  • Eat small meals, reducing the quantity of acid produced for digestion.
  • Eat lean meals, less caffeine, alcohol and garlic.
  • Quit smoking to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter.
  • Eat a balanced meal to regulate weight and prevent obesity and diabetes.

Pick up a copy of The Reflux Remedy Report to find out more about reflux disorder and how you can treat it.

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