heart attack

March 7, 2011

Signs of Hiatal Hernia

Hiatal hernias occur when a part of the stomach organ relocates to another area. The new area may be within the chest or beside the esophagus. This is allowed to happen when a weak diaphragm opens wider than normal and permits the stomach and lower esophageal sphincter to move upward. There are two kinds of hiatal hernias: sliding and rolling. These types are differentiated based on the location of the stomach.

Sliding Hiatal Hernia
It is essential that you become aware of the signs of a hiatal hernia. Being able to classify the symptoms will enable you to detect this condition early. Signs of a hiatal hernia often appear to be the same symptoms of gastroesphageal reflux disease (GERD). These symptoms may include burning in the throat or chest, regurgitation, chest pain, sore throat and hoarseness. Pain in the chest and stomach areas are very common ailments associated with a hiatal hernia.

Chest Pain

Chest pain is a major sign of a hiatal hernia. The chest pain experienced can range in level of intensity, but is usually accompanied by heartburn, another sign. This pain is commonly located behind the breastbone but can affect the lower and upper sections of the torso. Chest pain can be confused as a symptom of a heart attack or other cardiac condition. If you encounter numbness in the arms along with shortness of breath, you may be at risk of a heart attack.


Hearburn is a key sign of a hiatal hernia. Heartburn is caused when stomach acid backs up to the esophagus causing irritation and pain. There is increased vulnerability with a hiatal hernia because this condition pushes the stomach and lower esophageal sphincter into the chest and allows acidic fluid to flow backwards through the esophagus. Heartburn pain can be severe and is worsened by lying down. Chest pain, a burning sensation, bitter taste, chronic coughing and difficulty swallowing are just some of the signals of heartburn.

Hiatal Hernia Signs and GERD

The signs of a hiatal hernia strongly resemble the signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The signs of these two conditions can sometimes confuse you. Hiatal hernias can contribute to GERD but do not have to be present for GERD to develop. GERD is caused by gradual or sudden changes to the lower espohageal sphincter that fails to stop acid from refluxing into the esophagus.

What You Can Do

If you are experiencing any of these signs, you probably are suffering from a hiatal hernia. To reverse the effects of a hiatal hernia there are a number of treatment options that require lifestyle changes. By eating smaller meals, refraining from eating right before bed and not smoking or drinking a lot of alcohol, you reduce the presence of symptoms. You can also change your diet by limiting fatty foods and foods that are spicy and difficult to digest.


If you seek more information on the causes, signs, symptoms or treatments of a hiatal hernia, visit refluxremedy.com now. There you can get all of your questions answered and move forward with your life.

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January 21, 2011

Hiatal Hernia Symptoms

It’s important to know and be able to identify Hiatal Hernia symptoms so that the condition can be properly treated and prevented from escalating to a state of bleeding.

Symptoms of a Hiatal Hernia often closely resemble heartburn. They include a burning sensation in the chest, acid reflux (or stomach acids making their way up into your mouth), burping, hiccups and chest pain. However, this chest pain is different from the chest pain of a heart attack and it’s vital to differentiate between the two.

Hiatal Hernia chest pain is often the result of spasms due to the displaced stomach. The pain can be extreme, but it is often just pain, or pain accompanied by heartburn symptoms. The pain of a heart attack is often accompanied by shortness of breath and pain or numbness in an arm or hand. Knowing and understanding what these different symptoms indicate can be the difference between life and death. If you’re experiencing chest pain associated with shortness of breath, seek medical attention immediately.


A Hiatal Hernia happens when a portion of the stomach becomes displaced, and is forced through an opening in the diaphragm. Although it can be difficult to point to specific causes, some risk factors that may make you more susceptible to a Hiatal Hernia are smoking, obesity, and aging.

Hiatal Hernias that occur in younger children or infants are often a congenital condition that they were born with.


Hiatal Hernias are rarely serious conditions, but shouldn’t be ignored. They can often be somewhat painful, and so should be dealt with promptly. Surgery is seldom necessary, as your body can often heal itself of a Hiatal Hernia. However, there are a number of things you can do to help speed the healing process up.

If you’ve been diagnosed with a Hiatal Hernia, eat smaller meals, but do so more often. That way you’re giving your body the same amount of nutrition, just over a longer period of time, so that it can better digest the food and extract nutrients from it without getting overly stressed. This helps reduce the impact of eating on your already strained digestive tract.

Also, don’t eat right before you lay down. This will help prevent food from gathering in your stomach, and moving back up into your esophagus where it can cause irritation. You really shouldn’t eat less than two hours before bed if you are battling heartburn or a Hiatal Hernia. That way you won’t have any food or acid lying in wait when you do decide to go to bed.

Additionally, quit smoking. Smoking is very detrimental to your health, including your digestive system. Quitting will help your body heal at a more natural rate, and will help prevent a future Hiatal Hernia from occurring.

You can also reduce stress in your life to help your hernia heal. Although stress can’t be directly blamed as a cause for Hiatal Hernias, it can certainly hinder your body’s ability to heal from one. It tends to cause an overproduction of stomach acid, which can irritate your esophagus and stomach, slowing the healing process. So, do things to help yourself relax, like getting a massage or adding regular exercise to your routine. These things will help you tom maintain a healthy mind and body.

For more information on Hiatal Hernia symptoms, visit refluxremedy.com today!

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January 17, 2011

Heartburn Indigestion Symptoms

Heartburn indigestion symptoms can be a pain in the neck. They are nearly as wide ranging as their causes and methods of prevention. So, what is heartburn indigestion, what are its symptoms and how can you keep it from coming back?

Heartburn Indigestion

Heartburn indigestion happens when too much acid is produced in the stomach. This results in a buildup of pressure in the stomach and allows acid up into the esophagus. If this happens frequently enough it can cause long term damage to the esophagus that is difficult to repair for frequent heartburn indigestion sufferers.


Heartburn indigestion symptoms include pain that radiates through the stomach and chest. This is drastically different from the chest pain of a heart attack. It’s often associated with a burning sensation, where heart attack pain is felt as a weight on the chest, associated with shortness of breath and pain in the nearby extremities. It’s crucial to differentiate between these two conditions as correct treatment can be the difference between life and death in some situations.

Other symptoms associated with heartburn indigestion include burping, hiccups, and an overall feeling of an unsettled stomach.

Causes and Prevention

So, now that you know what to look for, what are the causes of heartburn indigestion and how can you stop it from happening to you? By practicing a healthy lifestyle and possibly changing a few of your daily habits you can easily eliminate heartburn indigestion from your life.

First, monitor what you eat. Certain foods: like caffeine, alcohol, onions, citrus and garlic are known to cause acid reflux, but you may have your own unique triggers. So watch what you eat so that you are able to point to a concrete cause of your most recent bout of heartburn indigestion.

Second, don’t eat quite so much in one sitting. Bombarding your stomach with large amounts of food causes it to sort of freak out, and frantically attempt to digest and process all that food. This results in pressure and acid build up, which equals pain and indigestion for you. So, just don’t eat so much all at once. That’s not to say you have to eat less across the board. To consume the same amount of food in a 24 hour period, just eat 4 little meals and a few snacks as opposed to 2 huge meals.

Third, don’t lie down right after you eat. This is sure to cause heartburn indigestion symptoms to creep up on you. That’s because gravity can’t help your body keep food and acid down in your stomach where it belongs. If acid is allowed up into your esophagus while you’re sleeping or napping, heartburn indigestion symptoms are sure to follow. So, try not to eat less than 2 hours before you go to bed, and if you do break that hard and fast rule, put an extra pillow under your head in an attempt to keep acids down where they belong.

Lastly, make sure that you de-stress your life. Stress causes a wide variety of illnesses, including heartburn indigestion. So make sure you take appropriate steps to avoid it. Meditate or put on some soothing music, practice yoga or exercise, take a deep breath, read a book, do an art project, go for a walk, do anything that will help you to relax. Take the focus off the situation and put it back onto your overall well being and you’ll find you’re a much happier and healthier person.

For more information on heartburn indigestion symptoms and how to prevent them naturally, visit refluxremedy.com now!

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January 11, 2011

Acid Indigestion Symptoms

Heartburn and acid indigestion plague millions of people worldwide. But, for someone who is experiencing it for the first time, it can be difficult to identify the symptoms of heartburn. So, what are some of the acid indigestion symptoms, what causes these symptoms, and how can they be prevented?


Symptoms of acid indigestion can be scary if you don’t know what they are. Chest pain is a main symptom; however it is different than that of a heart attack. Heartburn pain is often described as a burning sensation that radiates from the abdomen up into the chest and neck. A heart attack can feel like a weight on your chest, pain, and pain or numbness in your arm. It’s important to know the difference between these two symptoms and react accordingly.

Other symptoms of acid indigestion include reflux, or acid making it all the way up to your mouth, burping, hiccups and an overall feeling of indigestion.


These symptoms are a result of either acid overproduction, or acid being allowed into your esophagus, which can have a number of root triggers. They include daily habits, food and food consumption, and stress, among others.

Daily habits often cause acid indigestion. Something as simple as lying down right after eating isn’t good for digestion, and can easily result in heartburn. This is because when you’re in a horizontal position, acid is allowed to move freely through your stomach and esophagus. So, if you’ve just eaten, there may be acid and even food left in your stomach when you lie down. That means it’ll end up in your esophagus and cause acid indigestion if you don’t stay up for a bit longer. To avoid this, try eating no less than two hours before meals.

Food and how much of it you eat are huge triggers of heartburn and acid indigestion. Things like garlic, onions, caffeine, alcohol and citrus are common triggers, but you may have your own unique things that set you off. Keep track of what you eat so that you can easily point to your own acid indigestion culprits. Additionally, eating too much food at any one time can cause heartburn. This is because the body can’t process the sheer volume of food, and goes into overdrive of acid production. That creates a pressure buildup and causes indigestion and discomfort. In order to avoid this, try eating smaller meals more frequently. That will help your stomach more easily digest what you do give it, and keep indigestion at bay.

Stress is also a big indigestion trigger. It’s known to increase acid production, which can result in heartburn and discomfort. So, do things that will help you to relax. Listen to soothing music, take deep breaths, read a book, exercise, practice some yoga, whatever you need to do to help you calm down. It will help you prevent acid indigestion later in the day if you squash stress at its source.


Preventing acid indigestion is easier than you may think. Simple things like altering your daily habits and food intake as stated above can majorly help improve your quality of life when it comes to heartburn. However, there are plenty of other things you can try to keep heartburn at bay.

  • Papaya tablets can help you to more easily digest your food, and keep acid production down to a healthy level. Papaya contains digestive enzymes that help break down your food and make it more digestible.
  • Eating an apple before or after a meal can also help to keep heartburn at bay.

These are just a few of the natural prevention techniques found in The Reflux Remedy Report. The report contains hundreds of holistic methods for keeping your foods down where they belong.

For more information on acid indigestion symptoms and how to prevent them, visit refluxremedy.com today.

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