April 22, 2011

Preventing Acid Reflux

Acid reflux disease is a condition that plagues thousands of people every day. The awful thing about the condition is that it can take all the fun out of eating. Who wants to eat if the after affects are heartburn, belching, hiccups, regurgitation, coughing and sometimes nausea? It just doesn’t seem like the price you pay for good eating measures up to the benefit of eating at all. It’s true that the affects of acid reflux can vary from person to person ranging from mild discomfort in some to completely debilitating pain in others. All those suffering from acid reflux, no matter the extremity, can agree that if they could get rid of the condition altogether, it wouldn’t be too soon.

Acid reflux is a condition that if not properly tended to can lead to more serious conditions that can ultimately be life threatening. What happens with acid reflux is the acids found in the stomach that are used to break down foods for digestive purposes aren’t properly concealed in the stomach causing the acids to travel upward from the stomach into the esophagus resulting in acid reflux. The lower esophageal sphincter, LES, is a circular muscle valve that is located at the entrance of the stomach in the lower part of the esophagus. This valve’s job is to allow food and drinks to pass through from the esophagus to the stomach. Immediately after food and drinks pass through this valve, the valve is to close sealing off the stomach and the esophagus. This way, the acids that are rapidly at work digesting the food that has reached the stomach remain in the stomach so that there is no irritation caused to the esophagus.

A great way to control the hyperactivity of your stomach acids so that they are less likely to reach the esophagus resulting in acid reflux would be to prevent acid reflux triggers. There are several ways to prevent acid reflux. Below you will find a few:

  • Eat smaller meals more times a day. The smaller your meals the more likely your stomach acids will be able to take on breaking down and digesting these meals without producing too much acid that may result in acid hyperactivity.
  • Avoid foods that contain chocolate, citrus, caffeine, mint, garlic, onions and other foods that are high in fat. These foods have been known to weaken the LES muscle.
  • Avoid sodas and alcoholic beverages, opt instead for water. Water is great at stabilizing stomach acids and aids in the digestive process.
  • Try not to eat too close to bedtime. Give yourself at least two hours between the last meal of the day and the time you retire. This allows your body adequate time to fully and properly digest your foods.
  • Relieve your stress. Stress is linked to many ailments and acid reflux is no exception. Stress can directly affect the digestive system so do your part to relieve stress through exercise, mediation, and rest.

Preventing acid reflux can be better for your body than taming it after it starts. If you are seeking more preventative methods feel free to visit refluxremedy.com

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April 6, 2011

What Is Acid Reflux Disease

Acid reflux disease, also known as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), is a disease plaguing thousands of people every day. Acid reflux, simply stated, is what happens when the acids from the stomach that are used to breakdown and digest foods escape the stomach and leak into the esophagus causing what is commonly known as heartburn.

How does acid reflux happen?

Acid reflux happens when the circular ring, which is also a muscle, located at the entrance of your stomach and the lower part of your esophagus called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) doesn’t adequately serve its purpose. The purpose of the ring is to allow for the passing of food from the esophagus to the stomach. As soon as the food passes through, the LES is suppose to close, only opening if there is more food that needs access. If the LES neglects to close all the way or if it opens too often, the acid that is produced by your stomach to break down food can escape your stomach and make its way into the esophagus resulting in heartburn and other acid reflux symptoms. If this happens rarely, you should not be alarmed. However, if this occurrence happens two or more times a week you may be suffering from acid reflux disease.

Another cause of acid reflux disease is an abnormality of the stomach known as a hiatal hernia. This type of hernia occurs when the LES and the upper part of the stomach move above the diaphragm which is suppose to separate the stomach from the chest. The muscle that is the diaphragm serves as a sort of blockade helping to keep stomach acids in the stomach. With a hiatal hernia, acids may travel to the esophagus causing acid reflux disease.

Symptoms of acid reflux disease vary from person to person. While there are those who may experience acid reflux symptoms mildly, there are others that find acid reflux disease symptoms to be quite debilitating. The most common symptom of acid reflux disease is heartburn. Heartburn may be described as a burning or discomfort in the chest. This burning and discomfort has also been known to travel to the throat and lower abdomen. In rare instances, there have been reports of heartburn making its way to the back.

Regurgitation is also a symptom. Regurgitation happens when acids and undigested, recently consumed food and drinks travels up from the stomach into the esophagus and exits the body from the mouth. This symptom has been known to be accompanied by a sour or bitter taste in the mouth as well. Bloating, burping, hiccups, dysphagia (a narrowing of the throat), and in some cases nausea are also known symptoms.

There are ways to lessen the likelihood of acid reflux. The best way to rid acid reflux would be to change how and what you eat. Try eating smaller meals several times a day as opposed to large meals that may overwork stomach acids during digestion. Drink water instead of carbonated, caffeinated and alcoholic beverages. Eat at least two hours before bedtime, and if you are a smoker, quit. Also keep a food log. If you notice that some foods are triggers for acid reflux, eliminate these foods from your diet.

These are just a few suggestions. For more information on acid reflux disease feel free to visit refluxremedy.com.

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March 10, 2011

Gastro Reflux Symptoms

Gastro reflux, also known as Gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, is a condition stemming from a malfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a muscular ring located at the bottom section of the esophagus. After food travels down the esophagus to the stomach, the LES should close tightly, preventing stomach acids from heading up the esophagus. When this does not occur, and gastric acids are present in the esophagus, this results in heartburn, one of the symptoms of gastro reflux.

Heartburn is caused when acidic contents from the stomach are harmfully transplanted in the esophagus. This back up of acidic liquids and particles, can be severely painful and irritating. The burning sensation felt in the chest, along with hiccups and burping, are also signs of heartburn. People who suffer from heartburn typically experience a bitter taste in their mouth. The symptoms of heartburn are amplified during the night and worsen after eating. Consistent heartburn that occurs more than a few times per week, is a sign that gastro reflux has developed. Chronic heartburn affects a large portion of the population and is used as an indicator in determining if a person is likely to contract gastro reflux.

In some cases, the acidic fluid from the stomach that has backed up to the esophagus and throat can cause people to have difficulty breathing. If the refluxed fluid aggravates the larynx, the affected person can become hoarse, have a sore throat or temporarily lose their voice. The acidic juices can also irritate the respiratory track and make the breathing process strenuous and exhausting.

When the gastric acid reaches the throat (pharynx) and mouth, the burning feeling is magnified. The sour tasting substance can cause halitosis (bad breath) and hinder social interaction. Excessive burping, a common symptom of gastro reflux, is often wet and foul smelling. The liquid that is expelled during belching may burn and cause physical irritation.

Regurgitation is another uncomfortable symptom of gastro reflux. This takes place when food is swallowed but forced back up the esophagus due to a reflux reaction. The food and liquids that are regurgitated are highly acidic, and will burn the esophagus and throat. Depending on the amount and frequency of acidic substance that has been brought back up from the stomach, a person may need to discard the contents publicly, which can be humiliating.

Symptoms of gastro reflux are usually exacerbated due to certain behaviors and lifestyle choices. People that smoke tend to increase the effects of gastro reflux symptoms. Bending over, lifting heavy objects and even lying down may cause gastro reflux as well. Drink alcohol, and partaking in caffeinated products may contribute to gastro reflux.

Extended exposure to gastro reflux has the potential to develop into esophagitis. Esophagitis is characterized by severe inflammation to the esophagus that may reduce the size of the esophagus and hinder normal swallowing functions.

For more information on the symptoms of gastro reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease, visit refluxremedy.com today.

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February 10, 2011

Natural Remedies for Heartburn and Acid Reflux

Natural remedies for heartburn and acid reflux aren’t hard to come by. They’re nearly as numerous as the thousands of people that suffer from heartburn and acid reflux on a daily basis.

Heartburn occurs when there’s an excess of acid produced in the stomach for one reason or another. When this happens, the acid escapes and irritates the esophagus. This causes pain, belching, hiccups, and acid reflux (or acid making it all the way up into your mouth).

Since the two conditions, heartburn and acid reflux, go hand in hand, it’s relatively easy to squelch both problems with one method. However, finding the right method for you can be a bit harder. There are a variety of holistic methods and lifestyle changes you can try to be heartburn free in no time.

Holistic Methods

For some more natural remedies, try a few of these options before, after or during an attack of acid reflux or heartburn.

  • Ginger can help to cool a particularly heated bout of heartburn in a flash. Try some candied ginger or ginger tea to put out the fire.
  • Drinking a glass of water can help wash acid reflux out of your system. It will also help to dilute any acids left behind, providing you with fast pain relief.
  • Additionally, adding a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to that glass of water can help neutralize acids in your stomach or esophagus quickly.
  • Some people have had good luck with apples, and just eating a single apple after each meal to help keep heartburn away.
  • Others find relief by eating a handful of almonds between meals. The oils may have some components that help neutralize acids and keep heartburn from flaring up.

Change Your Routines

By making a few simple routine changes in your life you can easily stop heartburn in its tracks.

  • Try to avoid foods that consistently set your heartburn or reflux off. Some common foods that start a heartburn fire are garlic, caffeine, alcohol, citrus or any particularly acidic fruits, and onions. However, your body may react differently to other foods. Things like whole milk could give you heartburn, or chili peppers. So, keep track of what you eat, so that during your next episode of acid reflux you and point directly to the culprit.
  • Avoid eating right before you go to bed or lie down. Although you may enjoy having a bowl of popcorn and lying on the couch for a movie, eating that close to lying down doesn’t give your body a chance to properly process the food, and allows acids to freely move about your digestive tract, which irritates your esophagus. Wait at least 2 hours after you eat to go to bed or lie down.
  • Eat smaller portions of your food over a longer period of time. This will help reduce stress on your stomach and allow it to calmly process the food therein. Too much food all at once sends the stomach into overdrive, and causes an influx of acid in the stomach, creating pressure and irritation.

The Reflux Remedy Report is full of natural remedies for heartburn and acid reflux. Find it at www.refluxremedy.com, and get on your way to being heartburn free today!

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