controlling symptoms

March 8, 2011

Symptoms for GERD

If you constantly have a burning sensation in your chest, hiccup or belch frequently, particularly after a heavy, fatty meal, you may be experiencing heartburn, an ordinary symptom of GERD. Gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, is a condition that stems from frequent acid reflux caused when the lower esophageal sphincter operates outside of the ordinary. Instead of tightening to restrict the influx of stomach acid and food that once passed through the esophagus, the loose sphincter or muscular ring allows acid to enter up the esophagus and cause inflammation. When the acid makes contact with the esophagus, a burning feeling begins, and is commonly referred to as heartburn.

Main Symptoms

Heartburn, sometimes referred to as acid indigestion, is primarily felt behind the breast bone but may spread to other nearby areas including the throat and neck. This pain is usually paired with belching. Heartburn is widespread and affects about 40% of the population. Although heartburn alone does not reflect that GERD is present, people that suffer from heartburn several times per week probably have GERD or acid reflux disease.

Gastric acid regurgitation is often associated with heartburn and is a chief symptom of GERD. Regurgitation can be uncomfortable because the acidic content of the stomach has the ability to burn and irritate the esophagus. When this occurs, the esophagus may become inflamed and limit the access of food to the stomach and create pain with swallowing.

Less Obvious Symptoms

Some symptoms of GERD are less-common and may go accidentally unnoticed as a sign of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Chest pain, abdominal discomfort and nausea are among the symptoms that are often misinterpreted as symptoms for other medical conditions and diseases such as a heart attack. The simultaneous onset of these symptoms may be signs of Dyspepsia, where a general stomach ache occurs. Other symptoms for GERD are not typical at all but can serve as a warning sign. These atypical symptoms include but are not limited to asthma, sinusitis, a persistent cough, laryngitis and dentine hypersensitivity.

Defensive Treatment

Regulating the symptoms of GERD can be done through diet and habit. Eating meals that are less acidic a few hours before bed is a great way to reduce heartburn. Refraining from alcohol, fattening meals and chocolate can limit the frequency and intensity of heartburn and GERD. Over the counter medications like ibuprofen found in Advil and other pain relievers can exacerbate the symptoms of GERD. Drinking large amounts of water can neutralize the acidity of the stomach’s natural juices. Preventing GERD may be easier than treating it.

If you are not incorporated in your daily lifestyle and gastroesophageal reflux disease goes untreated, this may lead to gastritis and other complications of the esophagus. This can eventually cause difficulty with breathing and swallowing, essential everyday functions.

The Reflux Remedy Report contains more information on the symptoms for GERD and can assist you in determining your risk level. Go go to to view additional tips and methods of treating these symptoms.

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February 21, 2011

Acid Reflux Disorder

Acid reflux disorder is a condition that can occur when you have a lower esophageal sphincter (LES) that does not operate as it should. The LES is a crucial component of the digestive system. Food that is headed to your stomach when you eat has to pass the LES to enter the stomach for digestion. The LES serves as a muscular ring at the end of the esophagus, right next to the diaphragm and stomach opening. For food morsels to get to the stomach, the LES has to open. Usually, the LES closes after each portion of food goes to the stomach. If your LES is weak, it does not close tightly enough to prevent stomach acids from getting into your esophagus.

Stomach acid is the last thing you want near your esophagus. Stomach acid is used to digest foods. The digestive process may begin in your mouth, but it is in the stomach that most of the work takes place. Gastric acids help to break down foods into smaller particles so that the intestines can absorb and distribute the proteins and minerals that are essential for your body. The acidity of stomach acid is very high and it can only be tolerated in the stomach. The stomach wall and lining is equipped to handle the corrosive nature of stomach acid.

Once stomach acid gains access to your esophagus there can be a problem. The esophagus doesn’t have the same protective lining that the stomach has. When acid that comes from the stomach backs up into the esophagus, this is called acid reflux disorder. Acid reflux disorder can be a challenge for many people. By being more aware of acid reflux you will be able to identify the causes, signs and treatment options.

Causes: The cause of acid reflux may stem from other conditions. Being pregnant, obese, having a hiatal hernia or diabetes can contribute to acid reflux disorder. These conditions change the dynamics of the body, especially the stomach. When pressure is added to the stomach, there is a shift of the stomach. When food is digested irregularly, this can trigger acid reflux. Food is a big factor. Eating foods just before bed, lifting heavy objects or eating fatty foods can put you at risk for acid reflux disorder.

Signs: Symptoms of acid reflux disorder include heartburn, nausea, regurgitating food, chest pain, dysphagia, burping and an awful bitter taste in the mouth. Heartburn is the most common symptom of acid reflux disorder and can cause you to experience a burning feeling in your chest and throat. Signs in children may include respiratory problems that include a chronic cough, wheezing and asthma-like symptoms.

Treatment: Holistic remedies for acid reflux are highly suggested as a method of controlling symptoms. Drinking aloe juice, lots of water, and eating papaya will reduce the production of gastric acid in the stomach. Lifestyle changes like quitting smoking, eating less fattening meals and reducing alcohol intake are great techniques. Remember that effective treatment varies for each individual.

For more information on acid reflux disorder, review The Reflux Remedy Report to get all of your questions answered.

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